Friday, March 2, 2012

Making the Transition: Life After the Military


354th Fighter Wing
 
EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska - Military careers inevitably have a shelf life. Each airman will face a time in their career when he or she will have to make an informed decision about their future - life after the military.

Before shifting into civilian life, the Transition Assistance Program ensures service members gain critical information to better prepare for the next chapter.

According to Nick Campiglia, 354th Force Support Squadron community readiness technician, every service member needs to know about TAP because they will transition out of the military sooner or later.

As part of the program, whenever they plan to separate, airmen are encouraged to receive instruction in the form of a three-day seminar, which is offered to all active-duty, reservists and guardsmen planning to separate or retire. The seminar informs members how to prepare a resumé, dress for an interview and even participate in a mock-interview.

"The big thing that it does is it shows you how to take your Air Force specialty code and convert it into English to be used in a civilian resume if required," said Campiglia.

Through this seminar, the Airman and Family Readiness Center shares an available tool called O*NET OnLine to discover the occupational possibilities of a particular Air Force career field when crossing into the civilian sector. It helps to narrow the search for occupation, especially for Airmen who have highly specialized career fields where the corresponding civilian job is not always apparent. Some jobs are self explanatory, said Campiglia.

In addition to tips and tools, A&FRC staff members are capable of providing information pertaining to TAP and related topics, such as separating or retiring from the military, to help answer any questions in the process.

In today's changing economic environment, having the right information can make all the difference in the switch from military to civilian life. TAP can help fill in the gaps and the staff at the A&FRC is ready to answer any questions.

"It's just information," Campiglia said. "The better prepared you are, the easier your transition is going to be."

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